abakkus:

fishwifemcguinn:

hilarydesign:

kurokotetsuya:

same

same

Pretty much

2003:

image

2014:

image

just fucking draw. don’t compare yourself to other people, don’t stop because you drew a lot last tuesday and you haven’t visibly improved. it takes time, effort, and a lot of perseverance. besides, no matter how “bad” you think you are, there’s still gonna be someone who thinks the stuff you produce is the best goddamn thing they’ve ever seen in their entire life. the artist you were five years ago would have their mind fucking blown by the artist you are today. so just draw a fuckton, because every new thing you draw is one drawing better than you were before.

tagged as → #Tsuki's Queue

avajae:

Writability: How to Choose the Right Agent for YOU

So we’ve discussed why you need an agent (if you want to publish traditionally) and how not to get an agent. But now I want to talk about picking the right agent for you.

So here’s the thing about literary agents: the legit ones are all publishing savvy, business-minded, all around nice people who just really love books. Or at least, the ones I’ve come in contact with are. Every agent (like every person) has their own set of strengths and weaknesses, which often dictate what genres they do and don’t represent. And knowing those strengths and weaknesses is just a teensie bit important to know before you query.

That’s right. You need to research agents before you start queryingWhy? The answer’s simple, really—not every agent is the right agent for you

Some agents are editorial, some agents are not. Some agents represent a huge range of genres, some are much more focused on a couple genres and categories. Some agents have been in the business for over a decade, others are much newer to the publishing game.

I’ve already blogged about where to go to research agents (see that link above? Click it), so I’m not going to delve into that again. What I want to focus on instead, is what you need to be looking for when deciding what agents to query.

There are a couple questions you should be asking yourself while researching agents:

  • Does this agent represent my genre? This is the basic filter—the very first requirement is to make sure the agent you’re considering querying represents the genre and category your manuscript falls under. If they don’t, don’t query them. No exceptions. 

    No, it doesn’t matter if you think they might make an exception for your manuscript (they shouldn’t and they won’t). No, it doesn’t matter if you really like that agent (that doesn’t change the fact that your MS is not a genre they represent). No, it doesn’t matter if your manuscript is supposedly unlike others in its genre or category (if you think that’s the case, are you sure you know that genre as well as you think you do?)—if they don’t represent your genre, do not query them. You’ll get an insta-reject, and you’ll only be wasting your time and theirs.

    Note: if you’re not sure what genre your manuscript falls under, check out this post
  • Does this agent represent other genres I want to (or already do) write in? This is important, because you’re not just looking for representation for the manuscript you’re querying—you’re looking for representation for your whole career. Ideally, you’ll have the same agent throughout your career (though that isn’t always the case, which is okay). If your manuscript is a Historical Fantasy and you know going in that you also love writing Sci-Fi, make sure the agents you query represent both Historical Fantasies and Sci-Fi’s.

    Why? You want an agent who can potentially sell any manuscript you write, and if you write in multiple genres, you’ll want to make sure the agents you query represent all of them. 
  • Is this agent editorial? Is this important to me? As I’ve mentioned before, not all agents are editorial (meaning not all agents go through the extra process of revising and editing your work with you before going on submission). This is an extra job, and agents are not required to edit your work (remember: it’s your job to get your manuscripts as polished as possible before sending it to agents). If you know you want an agent who will help you with some of the revision and editorial process, then make sure you query agents who are editorial. (You can find this out through interviews and sites like Literary Rambles). 
  • What is this agent’s sales record? Do they have a lot of sales? A few things to remember with this one: not having a lot of sales doesn’t necessarily mean the agent is a bad agent. Some agents don’t report all of their sales, and some agents don’t have a lot of sales because they’re new agents, which is totally fine (and in that case, you’ll want to look at the sales for the agency they’re at, instead). But if an agent has been around for a couple of years, they should have some sales reported. 

    That being said, how much stock you put into the sales thing is up to you. When I was querying, I personally didn’t query anyone who didn’t list sales or their clients, but that’s just me. 
  • What is this agent’s reputation? What is the reputation of their agency like? Both of these are important to consider when researching agents. If the agent is established, what is their reputation like? If they’re new agents what is the reputation of their agency? (Note: it’s important to check on agency reputation for established agents, too). Check interviews, forums like Absolute Write Water Cooler and sites like Preditors & Editors as well as the aforementioned Literary Rambles to learn about agent and agency reputation.
  • Does this agent seem like someone I would work well with? Granted, this is a little more difficult to determine online, but if the agent has a Twitter, follow them long before you start querying. Also, take the time to read every interview you can find—both of these sources can give you insights into the agent’s personality and what their work process is like. There are a couple agents, for example, that I decided I wouldn’t query based off things they said or the way they behaved on Twitter—after all, if your personalities clash, it’s going to make the relationship between you and you future agent more difficult. 


Finally, two rules to remember while querying:

  1. Thou shalt not query every agent known to man. Use the criteria above to narrow down your list to agents that would work well for you and your manuscript. Consider every agent you query carefully. Think, if they offered representation, would I accept? If your answer is “no” then there’s little point in querying—you’re just wasting everyone’s time.

  2. A bad agent is worse than no agent. I’ve often heard of writers jumping to accept the first offer the get, just because they finally get an offer of representation. I understand this temptation, but the fact is, a bad agent will not help your career. Make sure you do plenty of research on every agent you query, and even more research on every agent who reads your full, and even more research on every agent who offers representation. Know what you’re getting into ahead of time to avoid unfortunate circumstances later on down the road. 


What tips do you have for choosing the right agent?

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tagged as → #Tsuki's Queue
raspbeary:

since a lot of people ask me, these are my current brushes! these 5 are pretty much the only thing i use for everything!

raspbeary:

since a lot of people ask me, these are my current brushes! these 5 are pretty much the only thing i use for everything!

tagged as → #Tsuki's Queue

cosplayleague:

The Photo of gorecorekitty as Pacific Rim’s Mako Mori has been one of our most popular entries and we’re incredibly excited to bring you even more photos of the copilot of Gypsy Danger!

Photos 1-4 by Manny Llanura
Photo 5 by Jason

You can find more from the Cosplay League at the following links

Facebook / Twitter / tumblr / YouTube / Google+ / Vine

tagged as → #Tsuki's Queue

taotastic replied to your photo “I finished Kuragehime’s manga….and I think it’s quite enough for now”

Holy shit you look just like her *A*

Now I know what cosplay I could do x’D

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tagged as → #taotastic #Tsuki talks

pigeonbits:

Color palette tutorial time!

This is by no means the Only Way To Pick Colors—it’s just a relatively-simple method I use sometimes.  I’ve found it works pretty well, almost regardless of what colors you pick—as long as you can keep them organized by those light/dark warm/cool categories, and make sure one category takes up a significantly higher proportion of page space, it usually turns out pretty good!

tagged as → #Tsuki's Queue

horohoros replied to your photo “I finished Kuragehime’s manga….and I think it’s quite enough for now”

dUDE YOU ARE JUST LIKE TSUKIMI, WHY DIDN’T I KNOW THIS ALL ALONG!!! (also utra cutie alert!!!)

missabiebunny replied to your photo “I finished Kuragehime’s manga….and I think it’s quite enough for now”

awww… Such a cutie! YOU’RE TSUKIMI IN REAL LIFE!!!!!!! 8D

THE SECRET IS OUT OH NO!!! (hehehe thanks)

image

oz-xiii replied to your photo “I finished Kuragehime’s manga….and I think it’s quite enough for now”

Said it once today already but I will say it again. You are so prettttty c:

Ooow Thank you dear

image

yohao88 replied to your photo “I finished Kuragehime’s manga….and I think it’s quite enough for now”

aw yeah!! XD

I found my inner Tsukimi xDDDD while getting rid of the other hairstyle

Reblog - Posted 13 hours ago with 1 note